Review of the Water-to-Go filtered water bottle (Updated)

The Water-to-Go bottle kindly provided by Water-to-Go for review purposes.

The Water-to-Go bottle kindly provided by Water-to-Go for review purposes.

Last year Water-to-Go kindly provided me with a sample bottle for review purposes.

They are obviously very proud of their bottle as I had told them that I was currently using a Travel Tap and that comparisons would likely be made. Despite this, they had enough confidence in their bottle to continue with the review.

The Water-to-Go bottle unpacked with the drinking tube in the raised position.

The Water-to-Go bottle unpacked with the drinking tube in the raised position.

The bottle is made from a soft rugged plastic that has a very handy rubberised grip surrounding the top portion of the bottle.

From my measurements the bottle weighs in at 177g, which is 19g lighter than the Travel Tap. The bottle can hold around 700mL of water, which is the same capacity as the Travel Tap.

In terms of dimensions it is around 22 cm tall by 8 cm wide. I found it small enough that it easily fits into the Osprey Exo’s side net pockets.

For testing purposes I took the Water-to-Go bottle out on two walks: A 4 day walk on Exmoor and a further 4 days out on Dartmoor in the Winter.

How did it perform?

Rather well as it happens…

My filtered bottles have two jobs to do. One is to act as the on-the-go bottle for drinking as I hike. The other purpose I use them for is to fill up other non-filtered bottles for camp - in this case a 1 Ltr Platypus Collapsable Bottle.

My filtered bottles have two jobs to do in the field. One is to act as the on-the-go bottle for drinking water as I hike. The other purpose is to fill up other non-filtered bottles for camp – in this case a 1 Ltr Platypus Collapsable Bottle.

The one big advantage the Water-to-Go bottle has over the Travel Tap can be seen below:

The one big advantage with the Water-to-Go bottle is that it is much easier to fill other bottles from it as the filter is located in the lid. This means that the bottle can be held upside down over the bottle to be filled - unlike the Travel Tap.

It is much easier to fill other bottles from the Water-to-Go bottle as the filter is located in the lid. This means that the bottle can be held upside down over the bottle to be filled, unlike the Travel Tap which must be held upright (very awkward).

Not only is it much easier to use for the filling of other bottles, but it also has a higher flow rate than the Travel Tap, which means that I can fill up my Platypus Bottles much more quickly.

The photo below shows how the filters are mounted on the two bottles:

The Water-to-Go bottle on the left has it's filter assembly mounted directly to the lid of the bottle. The Travel Tap's filter assembly on the right is on the end of a stalk which keeps it at the bottom of the bottle.

The Water-to-Go bottle on the left has it’s filter assembly mounted directly to the lid of the bottle. The Travel Tap’s filter assembly on the right is on the end of a stalk which keeps it at the bottom of the bottle.

It is the filter location in the lid that makes the Water-to-Go bottle much easier to use for filling other bottles.

However, I did notice that on the end of the last day of the Dartmoor trip that the Water-to-Go’s flow rate seemed a little diminished. I can only guess that this was as a result of topping up in an extremely shallow stream with lots of particulate matter. I think the cause was partially down to the filter design…

The filter assembly can be seen below:

The filter assembly on the Water-to-Go bottle - it lasts for 200 litres or 3 months.

The filter assembly on the Water-to-Go bottle – it lasts for 200 litres or 3 months.

The filter is directly exposed to the water in the bottle, so as a result, any particulate matter in the water will get caught up in the filter, which causes the reduced flow rate.

By comparison, the Travel Tap’s main filter is completely enclosed and has a pull-off mesh filter on the end to protect the main filter from particulate matter:

The Travel Tap's main filter assembly is completely enclosed and has a fine mesh filter (in yellow) to protect the inner filter from clogging up.

The Travel Tap’s main filter assembly.

Speaking of filters, the Water-to-Go’s filter has to be changed every 200 litres or every three months. By comparison, the Travel Tap’s filter is rated as 1600 litres with no real time limit. The filters of both bottles seem to cost roughly the same too (17.99 GBP for 2 Water-to-Go Filters vs 22.95 GBP for a single Travel Tap Filter).

So in terms of filter longevity it looks like the Travel Tap has it.

Filter Update: There have been two changes since this blog was posted! The first is that the Water-To-Go Filters are now sold in twin-packs for 17.99 GBP, making them a lot cheaper than the Travel Tap Filter.

In second change is that Water-To-Go have modified their filter assembly to provide more protection to the filter elements:

The updated Water-To-Go Filter!

The newer Water-To-Go Filter!

In terms of other features, there were two missing on the Water-to-Go bottle that I really missed.

The first is that it is not transparent, so it can be hard to determine how much water you have. That said, the newer models are available with transparent bodies – so this only applies to my older model.

The other feature I missed can be seen in the photo below:

A comparison of sizes between the Travel Tap on the left and the Water-to-Go bottle on the right.

A comparison of sizes between the Travel Tap on the left and the Water-to-Go bottle on the right.

Can you see what it is?

No?

It’s the dipping strap.

Without it, one is limited to water sources that one can reach at arms length:

Without a strap, water sources have to be within arms reach.

Without a strap, water sources have to be within arms reach.

With a strap, one can lower the bottle down into hard to reach places, plus the strap can also provide added security to prevent one accidentally dropping the bottle in the water:

The strap on the Travel Tap is extremely handy for reaching water sources that are too difficult to reach by hand.

The strap on the Travel Tap is extremely handy for reaching water sources that are too difficult to reach by hand.

Overall I found the Water-to-Go bottle to work extremely well and can see it as a cheaper alternative to the Travel Tap. At the time of writing a Water-to-Go bottle costs 24.99 GBP, whilst a Travel Tap will set you back 28.00 GBP.

The Water-to-Go bottle can be purchased here.

In terms of Pros and Cons vs the Travel Tap:

Pros

  • Lighter
  • Cheaper
  • Much higher flow rate
  • Easier to fill other bottles

Cons

  • No dipping strap
  • Relatively short filter life

Laters

RobP

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About RobP

Got into backpacking in the spring of 2012. I started as a couch potato then made my way through walker, hiker and now backpacker! As you can see from below I have far too many hobbies! :)
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4 Responses to Review of the Water-to-Go filtered water bottle (Updated)

  1. Jell Ellis says:

    Hi Rob

    Interesting review. Worth noting, however, that newer versions of the Travel Tap (I got mine in the spring last year) have the filter in the lid, like the Water-to-go. I think the short filter life on the Water-To-Go would be a deal breaker for me.

    Thanks for the review.

    Jell Ellis

  2. JohnBoy says:

    Good honest review Rob. I guess if you factor in the shorter filter life then the Travel Tap works out cheaper per litre of water.

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