June 2013 – Snowdonia Solo Walk – Day 2 – The climb up Mount Snowdon!

Day 2's route. Red is planned, Blue is actual. I managed to walk 21.3 km, climb 1439 mtrs and descend 1189 mtrs - including making it to the top of Mount Snowdon and the peak alongside it! So all in all, quite a busy day! The main deviation on the right was caused by an unmarked trail taking me further Eastward than was indicated on the map.

Day 2’s route. Red is planned, Blue is actual. I managed to walk 21.3 km, climb 1439 mtrs and descend 1189 mtrs – including making it to the top of Mount Snowdon and the peak alongside it! So all in all, quite a busy day! The main deviation on the right was caused by an unmarked trail taking me further Eastward than was indicated on the map.

Day 2 was to be the big day, the day I would summit Mount Snowdon at 1085 mtrs (3559 ft). When I woke up, I was a little in awe of the task at hand, but I guess that’s what makes it a challenge!

To add to the challenge I would be taking the most difficult direct route up there via the Watkin Path with an 18 kg load and walk around 21 km!

I did have one big clue during the walk with regard to its difficulty – but that clue didn’t sink in right away. The clue was that I didn’t see a single person on that trail, despite knowing that Snowdon is an extremely popular destination.

It wouldn’t be until I got to the top that I would see people – many people as it turned out! It seems that everyone else was climbing Snowdon via the Pyg and Miner’s tracks!

So if you like isolation, I would recommend the Watkin Path, but I will warn you that you will have to be good with heights for the final ascent stage. That part is very steep with a very big drop below you…

One of the issues that came to light on this journey and to a certain extent previous journeys with my new boots, was my energy levels. It seems that since wearing the new boots, I’m finding that 21-22km is about my limit before it starts feeling like a forced march. This is in stark contrast with my previous walks where I was clearing 35-44km on some days. Could this be down to the boots? I’m sure that it wasn’t my fitness as I am a lot fitter now than I used to be.

I can only theorise that the extra weight of my new boots was affecting my performance. These boots weigh in at 2Kg which makes them almost twice as heavy as my previous pair. I do like them though, as they seem to keep my feet dry – even when fording. But I am wondering whether the price in my physical performance is worth the entry fee? I will need more evidence though before I make any decisions about changing my footwear…

Back to the walk! As usual I’ll let the pictures paint the words. Here are a selection of them from my Facebook photo journal:

I awake before the sun has cleared the hills. Once again the sleeping bag is put out to air. Uppermost in my mind is the impending climb of Snowdon. I know from the Black Mountains, that if the weather isn't good - ie high winds - then the whole thing could be off. That said the weather at this level is looking good, so I have confidence that the climb will go ahead!

I awake before the sun has cleared the hills. Once again the sleeping bag is put out to air. Uppermost in my mind is the impending climb of Snowdon. I know from the Black Mountains, that if the weather isn’t good – ie high winds – then the whole thing could be off. That said the weather at this level is looking good, so I have confidence that the climb will go ahead!

On with the fruit porridge!

On with the fruit porridge!

The sun starts to clear the hill line. As on previous walks, the immediate difference in temperature can be felt straight away and is very welcoming on this chilly morning!

The sun starts to clear the hill line. As on previous walks, the immediate difference in temperature can be felt straight away and is very welcoming on this chilly morning!

The Akto tent bathing in the morning sunlight!

The Akto tent bathing in the morning sunlight!

The Watkin Path starts off innocuously enough...

The Watkin Path starts off innocuously enough…

On the way up I spot this plaque in the old slate quarry.

On the way up I spot this plaque in the old slate quarry.

The Watkin Path starts to steepen as I proceed through the slate quarry. Right now I'm a little worried. I have been walking for around 30 mins, but haven't seen anybody! Before I arrived here I did my research and apparently Mount Snowdon is extremely popular - so where was everyone?

The Watkin Path starts to steepen as I proceed through the slate quarry. Right now I’m a little worried. I have been walking for around 30 mins, but haven’t seen anybody! Before I arrived here I did my research and apparently Mount Snowdon is extremely popular – so where was everyone?

Parts of the path soon become a little rocky...

Parts of the path soon become a little rocky…

One of the downsides to mountain climbing and wild-camping is that when combined, one has a fairly hefty load to take up the mountain. In my case around 18Kg!

One of the downsides to mountain climbing and wild-camping is that when combined, one has a fairly hefty load to take up the mountain. In my case around 18Kg!

The path steepens up some more! I'm now finding that I'm having to use my hands a lot more for the ascent. And once again I'm left wondering, where is everyone?

The path steepens up some more! I’m now finding that I’m having to use my hands a lot more for the ascent. And once again I’m left wondering, where is everyone?

I'm now having to do some proper climbing, which all adds to the fun! :)

I’m now having to do some proper climbing, which all adds to the fun! 🙂

The path at this point seems to alternate between rather easy and rather hard, almost like it has a split personality!

The path at this point seems to alternate between rather easy and rather hard, almost like it has a split personality!

I have now gained enough elevation that I can see the coastline off in the distance!

I have now gained enough elevation that I can see the coastline off in the distance!

Here I'm looking up at 'West Peak' - I think....

Here I’m looking up at ‘West Peak’ – I think….

I clear the ridge line by West Peak and look down - my breath is completely taken away by both my elevation and the beautiful view of the Llyn Llydaw reservoir! It's views like these that make hill climbing worthwhile.

I clear the ridge line by West Peak and look down – my breath is completely taken away by both my elevation and the beautiful view of the Llyn Llydaw reservoir! It’s views like these that make hill climbing worthwhile.

To the West I see the peak of Snowdon itself. It is getting closer, but still looks a long way up. Rather alarmingly it is at this point that a realisation hits me. The realisation that I'm going to be climbing up that rather steep looking peak. It almost doesn't seem possible from this vantage point. Maybe that's why I haven't seen anyone on this route to the top? :)

To the West I see the peak of Snowdon itself. It is getting closer, but still looks a long way up. Rather alarmingly it is at this point that a realisation hits me. The realisation that I’m going to be climbing up that rather steep looking peak. It almost doesn’t seem possible from this vantage point. Maybe that’s why I haven’t seen anyone on this route to the top? 🙂

Now that I'm on a ridge-line, the going isn't too bad. In fact it is a lot easier than the previous ascent. However, the peak is looming nearer and looking quite daunting!

Now that I’m on a ridge-line, the going isn’t too bad. In fact it is a lot easier than the previous ascent. However, the peak is looming nearer and looking quite daunting!

I'm now at the base of the peak proper. It doesn't start off too badly, despite the steepness. However, the track seems to end, resulting in me climbing my own route up there. On subsequent examination of the GPS it turns out that the path does go all the way up, but somehow I managed to miss most of it! Doh!

I’m now at the base of the peak proper. It doesn’t start off too badly, despite the steepness. However, the track seems to end, resulting in me climbing my own route up there. On subsequent examination of the GPS it turns out that the path does go all the way up, but somehow I managed to miss most of it! Doh!

The view back toward West Peak. In the distance one can just make out part of the Watkin Path.

The view back toward West Peak. In the distance one can just make out part of the Watkin Path.

It seems that Snowdon's peak does a nice line in steepness! The loose rock and scree make progress a lot more difficult too!

It seems that Snowdon’s peak does a nice line in steepness! The loose rock and scree make progress a lot more difficult too!

Don’t look down! It’s a long way to the bottom. As a result I’m triple checking all my handholds and footholds – especially with the looseness of the rock. You do hear of walkers losing their lives on the Watkin Path – presumably it’s this section that’s the primary cause. I’m climbing it in low winds and very good weather – I can’t imagine doing this in bad weather or in the Winter…

Don’t look down! It’s a long way to the bottom. As a result I’m triple checking all my handholds and footholds – especially with the looseness of the rock. You do hear of walkers losing their lives on the Watkin Path – presumably it’s this section that’s the primary cause. I’m climbing it in low winds and very good weather – I can’t imagine doing this in bad weather or in the Winter…

A self portrait whilst on the Watkin path. I think that the majority of people never get to see this route, which is a shame because the views on it are stunning!

A self portrait whilst on the Watkin path. I think that the majority of people never get to see this route, which is a shame because the views on it are stunning!

Toward the top I run into the track proper again! Woot! This makes things a little easier! The steepness and rockiness of the terrain makes it very difficult to tell how much of the climb I have left.

Toward the top I run into the track proper again! Woot! This makes things a little easier! The steepness and rockiness of the terrain makes it very difficult to tell how much of the climb I have left.

The view to the East - just stunning and not a soul around!

The view to the East – just stunning and not a soul around!

Whoopie!!!! This stone marker indicates that I have made it onto the peak's main ridge-line. That's the main climb out of the way. The rest should be plain sailing in comparison!

Whoopie!!!! This stone marker indicates that I have made it onto the peak’s main ridge-line. That’s the main climb out of the way. The rest should be plain sailing in comparison!

Just ahead of me, the peak of Mount Snowdon beckons...

Just ahead of me, the peak of Mount Snowdon beckons…

Another self portrait - this time on Snowdon's main ridge line! The view is just amazing. I couldn't have hoped for better weather!

Another self portrait – this time on Snowdon’s main ridge line! The view is just amazing. I couldn’t have hoped for better weather!

I'm now on the final climb to the peak proper. On the way up I keep catching glimpses of strange fan noises. I know what they are. Snowdon's Peak actually has a cafe on the top of it *eeek* and a railway-track servicing it. Luckily from the Watkin Path approach, none of this is visible.

I’m now on the final climb to the peak proper. On the way up I keep catching glimpses of strange fan noises. I know what they are. Snowdon’s Peak actually has a cafe on the top of it *eeek* and a railway-track servicing it. Luckily from the Watkin Path approach, none of this is visible.

The view to the South West as I near the peak - again I'm taken aback by the scenery!

The view to the South West as I near the peak – again I’m taken aback by the scenery!

The side of the Cafe at 1085 mtrs above sea level! I was greeted by a small crowd of climbers resting on it's steps. They clapped me when I got up there and wondered where I had come from - as apparently everyone else was using a different way up....

The side of the Cafe at 1085 mtrs above sea level! I was greeted by a small crowd of climbers resting on it’s steps. They clapped me when I got up there and wondered where I had come from – as apparently everyone else was using a different way up….

Any hopes of food or drink are dashed as the cafe is shut. No problems for me as I'm self sufficient for 3 days! From the mutterings of other climbers though, they were a little disappointed and it would seem they were relying on it being open!

Any hopes of food or drink are dashed as the cafe is shut. No problems for me as I’m self sufficient for 3 days! From the mutterings of other climbers though, they were a little disappointed and it would seem they were relying on it being open!

Up ahead are the steps to the peak. There are a lot of people here. Nearly all of them have come up via the Miner's and Pyg tracks. These two tracks are shorter, less steep and also start 360 mtrs above sea level thus cutting out a fair bit of climb. In contrast the Watkin Path practically starts at sea level and as shown in previous photos can be very steep! At least I now know where all the people went!

Up ahead are the steps to the peak. There are a lot of people here. Nearly all of them have come up via the Miner’s and Pyg tracks. These two tracks are shorter, less steep and also start 360 mtrs above sea level thus cutting out a fair bit of climb. In contrast the Watkin Path practically starts at sea level and as shown in previous photos can be very steep! At least I now know where all the people went!

In a typical British manner I await my turn before climbing the final few steps!

In a typical British manner I await my turn before climbing the final few steps!

The view back to the Cafe on the Mountain Top. In many respects I thought it spoilt this Mountain - but then again I guess it does give people lacking the fitness the ability to enjoy the phenomenal views.

The view back to the Cafe on the Mountain Top. In many respects I thought it spoilt this Mountain – but then again I guess it does give people lacking the fitness the ability to enjoy the phenomenal views.

The awesome view from the very top of Mount Snowdon. Shame it is spoilt by someone's discarded cup in the rocks directly in front! :(

The awesome view from the very top of Mount Snowdon. Shame it is spoilt by someone’s discarded cup in the rocks directly in front! 😦

The view from the top of Mount Snowdon's trig point. It's trig point is embellished compared with standard trig points and includes this brass points of interest locator!

The view from the top of Mount Snowdon’s trig point. It’s trig point is embellished compared with standard trig points and includes this brass points of interest locator!

Woot!!!! I made it!!! I'm at the very top of Mount Snowdon at a height of 1085 mtrs (3559 ft). I have now broken my own climb record so I'm now very happy! :D

Woot!!!! I made it!!! I’m at the very top of Mount Snowdon at a height of 1085 mtrs (3559 ft). I have now broken my own climb record so I’m now very happy! 😀

I was on a roll, so decided to also climb the peak alongside Mount Snowdon - Garnedd Ugain. So here I am with another victory pose! *Cue Cheesy Grin*

I was on a roll, so decided to also climb the peak alongside Mount Snowdon – Garnedd Ugain. So here I am with another victory pose! *Cue Cheesy Grin*

The gorgeous view over two Cairns as I descend back down from Mount Garnedd Ugain.

The gorgeous view over two Cairns as I descend back down from Mount Garnedd Ugain.

I make it back to the saddle between the two mountains. There is a large number of people here with hundreds more climbing up the Miner/Pyg Tracks. This stone marker marks the end of the Miner's track for people climbing it. In my case I will be using it to get back down off the mountain.

I make it back to the saddle between the two mountains. There is a large number of people here with hundreds more climbing up the Miner/Pyg Tracks. This stone marker marks the end of the Miner’s track for people climbing it. In my case I will be using it to get back down off the mountain.

I bump into a lot of people on the way down. Many of them look exhausted. I kind of felt guilty going down this route and having to say hello to all these peeps as they are doing their ascents.

I bump into a lot of people on the way down. Many of them look exhausted. I kind of felt guilty going down this route and having to say hello to all these peeps as they are doing their ascents.

On the way down the Miner's Track I spot this rather odd wooden post with coins randomly inserted into it!

On the way down the Miner’s Track I spot this rather odd wooden post with coins randomly inserted into it!

I'm still descending. On more than one occasion I get asked why I'm carrying so much. So I end up telling people that this is my second day of a three day walk - hence all the kit.

I’m still descending. On more than one occasion I get asked why I’m carrying so much. So I end up telling people that this is my second day of a three day walk – hence all the kit.

I get to the first body of water called Glaslyn. It feels like I have reached the bottom, but in reality there is still a long way to go!

I get to the first body of water called Glaslyn. It feels like I have reached the bottom, but in reality there is still a long way to go!

I'm now back on the descent to get to the Llyn Llydaw reservoir which I first spotted from high up on the ridges!

I’m now back on the descent to get to the Llyn Llydaw reservoir which I first spotted from high up on the ridges!

The Llyn Llydaw reservoir comes into view. Rather bizarrely I'm finding the descent quite hard work. In some ways it is harder than the climb and is certainly playing havoc with my knees and feet. The rocky paths don't seem to help in this regard.

The Llyn Llydaw reservoir comes into view. Rather bizarrely I’m finding the descent quite hard work. In some ways it is harder than the climb and is certainly playing havoc with my knees and feet. The rocky paths don’t seem to help in this regard.

I get to the end of the Miner's track where I'm greeted by a Cafe. I feel so low on energy from my climb, that in a departure from my normal hiking philosophy, I decide to pop in for a pasty and Lucozade. Normally I shun civilisation when I'm out hiking, but in this case it was most welcome.

I get to the end of the Miner’s track where I’m greeted by a Cafe. I feel so low on energy from my climb, that in a departure from my normal hiking philosophy, I decide to pop in for a pasty and Lucozade. Normally I shun civilisation when I’m out hiking, but in this case it was most welcome.

I'm now back on the trail headed South East. This part of the journey was a kind of anti-climax. I had done the big climb and was both foot sore and knee-sore from it. But now I had to finish off the 21km I needed to clear today. This part of the journey just didn't seem as glamourous. It's not that the views were bad, far from it, it's just that down here they could never be as good as the ones I saw from the top of Mount Snowdon.

I’m now back on the trail headed South East. This part of the journey was a kind of anti-climax. I had done the big climb and was both foot sore and knee-sore from it. But now I had to finish off the 21km I needed to clear today. This part of the journey just didn’t seem as glamourous. It’s not that the views were bad, far from it, it’s just that down here they could never be as good as the ones I saw from the top of Mount Snowdon.

Here I'm starting a climb up Bwlch y Rhediad. I need to climb around 350 mtrs to get to a plateau where I intend to make camp for the evening. There is supposed to be a trail up here, but I can't find it, so elect to go cross country instead.

Here I’m starting a climb up Bwlch y Rhediad. I need to climb around 350 mtrs to get to a plateau where I intend to make camp for the evening. There is supposed to be a trail up here, but I can’t find it, so elect to go cross country instead.

Above me I spot someone para-gliding - now that looks like fun!

Above me I spot someone para-gliding – now that looks like fun!

I'm now a little locationally challenged! I kind of know where I am but not precisely enough to determine the route to the pass above me. To aid me, I take a compass bearing off of the end of the Llyn Gwynant Reservoir and take a back bearing from that and plot it on my map. According to my map there is a stream just at my feet and a wall behind me. Both observations are bang on!!! Compass skills +1! I now know that I need to follow the wall Southward to find the track exit to the pass!

I’m now a little locationally challenged! I kind of know where I am but not precisely enough to determine the route to the pass above me. To aid me, I take a compass bearing off of the end of the Llyn Gwynant Reservoir and take a back bearing from that and plot it on my map. According to my map there is a stream just at my feet and a wall behind me. Both observations are bang on!!! Compass skills +1! I now know that I need to follow the wall Southward to find the track exit to the pass!

Hand-railing the wall based on my compass observation. At some point I should see a gate - assuming my navigation is good!

Hand-railing the wall based on my compass observation. At some point I should see a gate – assuming my navigation is good!

Bingo! One gate leading to the pass, which should take us onto the plateau on Bwlch Y Rhediad! Hoorah for the compass and map!

Bingo! One gate leading to the pass, which should take us onto the plateau on Bwlch Y Rhediad! Hoorah for the compass and map!

I take a last look down the valley and toward Snowdon before I leave them both for this journey.

I take a last look down the valley and toward Snowdon before I leave them both for this journey.

Across the valley on Max zoom I spot the Watkin Path and the location of this morning's camp site - I was camped above that winding trail. It seems quite far away now!

Across the valley on Max zoom I spot the Watkin Path and the location of this morning’s camp site – I was camped above that winding trail. It seems quite far away now!

I'm now headed Eastward on the plateau. The plan is to camp within 5 km of the railway station at Roman Bridge to ensure that I made it there on time the following day. So just a little further to go!

I’m now headed Eastward on the plateau. The plan is to camp within 5 km of the railway station at Roman Bridge to ensure that I made it there on time the following day. So just a little further to go!

I was going to deviate North for around 2 km to make camp by Llynau Diwaunydd - a double reservoir. But I'm completely out of energy and find a water source nearby to this location so decide to camp here instead. At least I'm in the best place for my final walk tomorrow. I am a little concerned about my lack of pick-up-and-go. Was it physcological? A result of the anti-climax after the big climb, or was it down to a genuine lack of energy - despite my cafe stop over?

I was going to deviate North for around 2 km to make camp by Llynau Diwaunydd – a double reservoir. But I’m completely out of energy and find a water source nearby to this location so decide to camp here instead. At least I’m in the best place for my final walk tomorrow. I am a little concerned about my lack of pick-up-and-go. Was it physcological? A result of the anti-climax after the big climb, or was it down to a genuine lack of energy – despite my cafe stop over?

And tonight's main meal is Chilli Con Carne - once more Mountain House meals excel!

And tonight’s main meal is Chilli Con Carne – once more Mountain House meals excel!

The sun starts to set on a long day. I managed to climb the highest Mountain in England and Wales, using the most difficult approach and managed to put in a 21 km walk too. So not too bad overall. However, I still have concerns about my energy levels. I know from previous walks that I can walk 44 km a day over very hilly terrain - but here I felt that 21km was my limit. Part of me is beginning to wonder whether it could be my new boots? These boots are a lot heavier than the old ones and between them weigh in at almost 2 kg!!! I wonder if this is having an effect on my performance?

The sun starts to set on a long day. I managed to climb the highest Mountain in England and Wales, using the most difficult approach and managed to put in a 21 km walk too. So not too bad overall. However, I still have concerns about my energy levels. I know from previous walks that I can walk 44 km a day over very hilly terrain – but here I felt that 21km was my limit. Part of me is beginning to wonder whether it could be my new boots? These boots are a lot heavier than the old ones and between them weigh in at almost 2 kg!!! I wonder if this is having an effect on my performance?

A close up of the Watkin Path Ascent up to Mount Snowdon. My route is modified a bit as I also decided to go for a nearby peak too - and why not given that I was already up there? :)

A close up of the Watkin Path Ascent up to Mount Snowdon. My route is modified a bit as I also decided to go for a nearby peak too – and why not given that I was already up there? 🙂

Don't know how I did it! But on the final climb of Mount Snowdon I seemed to have missed most of the trail! Perhaps if I had not lost it, the climb would have been easier?

Don’t know how I did it! But on the final climb of Mount Snowdon I seemed to have missed most of the trail! Perhaps if I had not lost it, the climb would have been easier?

Laters
RobP

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About RobP

Got into backpacking in the spring of 2012. I started as a couch potato then made my way through walker, hiker and now backpacker! As you can see from below I have far too many hobbies! :)
This entry was posted in Backpacking, Camping, Hiking, Multi-Day Walk, Navigation, Rab, Snowdon, Snowdonia, Watkins Path and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to June 2013 – Snowdonia Solo Walk – Day 2 – The climb up Mount Snowdon!

  1. Robin says:

    Serious walk with a heavy pack! With food and water, my max all up weight is 12-13kg and that’s with spare clothes and robust shelter (Scarp1). Your boots seem heavy as well. I use lightweight mid boots, Salomon Fastpackers or Ecco Biom Hike mids. You could try trail shoes, but I prefer mid boots. You might want to think about a lighter cooking system (haven’t used my Trangia in ages) and a lighter rucksack like the GG Mariposa.

    The new cafe is much nicer than the old one, which was an absolute eyesore. The south ridge is lovely and less arduous 🙂

    • RobP says:

      You are right about the weight of my kit. Over the last weekend I sat down and weighed everything (I suspect most hikers go through this at some point!). There were a few surprises, like the empty rucksack weighing in at almost 2kg!

      I’m looking to replace the rucksack with an Osprey Exos 58 and the Trangia with a Jet Boil sol. Between these two changes, for a 3 day trip it should shave off around 2.5 kg which is a start!

      I used to have Salomans and loved them, though they did start to leak. But I never got any blisters with those so I might go back to them.

      As for the South Ridge, that was my original plan, but I couldn’t find many references to it on the Internet, so wasn’t sure of its viability – so went and chose the Watkins Path which seems to have more press.

      Didn’t realise your walk was in Snowdonia too, until I read your last blog entry. Fr some reason I thought it was in South Wales. Snowdonia is an awesome place to hike, great views, plenty of water and large enough to allow some good exploration – can’t wait to go back!

  2. Jim says:

    I just came across your blog. Congratulations on a grand walk and thanks for an engaging read. A few days after you, I was pitched on Gallt y Wenallt at the end of Snowdon’s south ridge. A dawn start meant I only shared the summit with 2 other early risers.

    That final scree ascent up Yr Wyddfa’s south face is hot work indeed. The erosion is so advanced that it’s hard to follow, or even identify the original path.

    Incidentally, the West Peak you refer to is the western summit of the 3-topped Y Lliwedd. It’s a cracking walk over the top and much easier than it appears from below. The south ridge also has the benefit of being so much quieter. The full north ridge via Crib Goch and Garnedd Ugain is also a superb route, if you like a bit of scrambling and have a good head for heights, but a very early start is required to avoid the masses! I wouldn’t suggest the latter route with a large pack though.

    • RobP says:

      Thanks Jim!
      I’m a relative newbie to all this, but I am finding it addictive, especially the hill climbing. I found the ascent of Snowdon to be exhilarating.

      Thanks for your advice on the other climbs nearby – I want to go back to Snowdonia for a lot longer walk as there is so much to see there.

      One thing I do need to do is get some mountain training, especially for the winter as I’m sadly lacking a number of skills in this area 🙂

  3. chris says:

    great blog mate, the place you looked over the the edge close to west llewyd to look at llyn lydaw is the very spot myself and my son wild camped last night, it was hard going up the watkin path because all the extra water we had to carry because of the hot conditions but well worth it, i like the watkin i think most people are put off it because of the final climb up the loose scree, i was amazed that from 5.00pm friday until we packed up camp at 6.00am saturday we didnt see a single person and i waited until 9.00pm friday to pitch the tent, i will show you a pic of our camp if you would like to see it, like i say its a couple of feet back from where your standing.

    • RobP says:

      Thanks Chris. In my original plan I was going to camp up here my self as there are two small tarns located up on the ridge just to the West. A perfect camp spot, great views, plus water. Unfortunately, the nature of my schedule meant it would have been impractical to do it.

      It’s weird how few people attempt the Watkin Path, especially when the views are so good. Sounds like you had a good time up there. Would love to see a pic of your camp! 🙂

  4. chris says:

    hi rob can you tell me how to add a picture to your blog as cant find a way of doing so

  5. Pingback: 2013 – A Year in Review | Uk Backpacker

  6. linhartb says:

    Beautiful views! We hiked up to the summit of Snowdon a few years ago but we were in complete fog at the top and didn’t have the great views!

    • RobP says:

      That’s the problem with the UK, the weather can be quite fickle. There are many places I’m going to have to revisit, in the hope of getting better views the next time around. 🙂

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