Water Water Everywhere – but not a drop to drink!

When hiking over many days the question of water supplies becomes an important issue. Water weighs approximately 1Kg per Litre, so carrying around enough for a four day walk would be completely impractical!

So how do I do it?

Simples! I use a special water bottle called a ‘Travel Tap’ by Drink-Safe Systems. This is a 800mL bottle that includes built in filtration and bio protection.

The Travel Tap - circa last year - hence its new appearance!

The Travel Tap – circa last year – hence its new appearance!

The travel tap is simply filled from any fresh water source using the convenient strap to dip it in. The lid is then screwed on. To drink from it one just squeezes the bottle in the upright position and the water squirts out of the folding nozzle. It is provided with a shoulder harness which ensures that it is always nearby for use. This can be seen in the photo below:

Here, the blue container holding the Travel Tap can be seen slung down my right hand side. The perfect position for a quick drink!

Here, the blue container holding the Travel Tap can be seen slung down my right hand side. The perfect position for a quick drink!

With a Travel Tap, one doesn’t have to carry a lot of water around and in the Uk at least, can be guaranteed of never running out of water on a walk!

The filter is highly effective and has been proven world wide. There are even reports of some soldiers urinating in them and being able to drink that with no ill effect! That’s an extreme example, and not something that I personally do, but I have to say I’m continually amazed at the type of water it lets me drink safely.

On top of the Travel Tap I always carry two Platypus 1 Litre collapsable bottles. One of these is always kept filled up and is stored in a rucksack side pocket. It is used as insurance, for situations where I don’t come across a stream or puddle for a while.

Prior to making camp I fill all my bottles up. This is a necessity as my Freeze Dried meals require a fair bit of water, plus it’s nice to be able to make a number of hot drinks when at camp.

Here I'm filling my 1 litre bottles prior to camp. They are filled directly from the Travel Tap to ensure clean water.

Here I’m filling my 1 litre bottles prior to camp. They are filled directly from the Travel Tap to ensure clean water.

The two Platypus collapsable 1 Litre bottles. I always keep one full up on standby in the rucksack. They only time both bottles get filled is just prior to making camp.

The two Platypus collapsable 1 Litre bottles. I always keep one full up on standby in the rucksack. The only time both bottles get filled is just prior to making camp.

Filling the 1 Litre bottles from the Travel Tap does take a bit of time, but when one is out in the wilds, time isn’t a problem! 🙂

Below are some of the water sources that I used on my recent 4 day solo walk in the Black Mountains. This should give you an idea as to how flexible the Travel Tap is!

Here I fill up on some running water on the side of a hill!

Here I fill up on some running water on the side of a hill!

When high up, in this case 700 odd metres, there isn't a lot of water available, so one has to make do with what one has!

When high up, in this case 700 odd metres, there isn’t a lot of water available, so one has to make do with what one has!

A water source from day 3!

A water source from day 3!

A water source from day 2 - it tastes better then it looks!

A water source from day 2 – it tastes better then it looks!

Found this rather odd water source on my travels!

Found this rather odd water source on my travels!

Water from a stream known as the River Usk!

Water from a stream known as the River Usk!

The only real downside with the Travel Tap is that in very cold conditions -10c or colder it freezes up easily. On my last walk I learnt this the hard way. For future trips I will keep it under my jacket!

The one downside of the travel tap is that it freezes too easily. In the future I will be keeping this under my insulative clothing in the winter.

The one downside of the travel tap is that it freezes too easily. In the future I will be keeping this under my insulative clothing in the winter.

Laters
RobP

Advertisements

About RobP

Got into backpacking in the spring of 2012. I started as a couch potato then made my way through walker, hiker and now backpacker! As you can see from below I have far too many hobbies! :)
This entry was posted in The Black Mountains, Tips, Water and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Water Water Everywhere – but not a drop to drink!

  1. Kristian says:

    Hello, you have a Great section of content.
    I just stumbled upon your web site. The clarity in your post is simply cool.
    Anyway I’ll be subscribing to your posts, if possible ! I suppose its ok to use some of your excellent ideas! You really have a talent for writing. Thank you, very much.

  2. Larry says:

    Enjoyed the Exmoor trip.
    And what a great advert for Travel Tap. I’m going to have to buy one.
    I beg, steal or borrow (?) water – or use purification tablets at wild sources. The tablets leave an after taste.

    • RobP says:

      Thanks Larry. The Travel Tap is an awesome piece of kit and has never let me down. I have drunk from some very dodgy sources with it, but I have never gotten Ill. I highly recomend it 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s